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In der deutschen Adaption der japanischen Gameshow versuchen Kandidaten, vier trickreiche Hindernisparcours zu überwinden. Dabei müssen sie ihre Kraft und Ausdauer unter Beweis stellen. Der beste Teilnehmer wird am Ende der `Ninja Warrior'. Bei «Ninja Warrior Germany» kämpfen die Athleten im härtesten TV-​Hindernisparcours Deutschlands um den Titel. Ninja Warrior Germany – Die stärkste Show Deutschlands ist eine von Norddeich TV produzierte und von RTL seit gesendete Spielshow, in der. Ninja Warrior ist eine in Japan unter dem Namen Sasuke produzierte Wettkampfshow. Das Ziel der Show ist es, vier Hindernis-Parcours (auch Stages genannt). Die Show ▷ Ninja Warrior Germany (RTL) streamen & weitere Highlights aus dem Genre Show im Online Stream bei TVNOW anschauen. Jetzt mitfiebern!

ninja worrior

Die aktuelle Staffel der Fernsehshow „Ninja Warrior Germany“ wird nicht wie geplant im Mai und Juni in der Messe Karlsruhe stattfinden. Wir informieren Sie kostenlos, wenn Ninja Warrior Germany im Fernsehen läuft. Ninja Warrior ist eine in Japan unter dem Namen Sasuke produzierte Wettkampfshow. Das Ziel der Show ist es, vier Hindernis-Parcours (auch Stages genannt).

She was the first Japanese woman to ever clear the Dragon Glider. Although, she became to tired after finishing the tackle, and timed out at the Warped Wall.

In fall , the G4 network held a contest called the American Ninja Challenge , whose grand prize was a trip to Japan to compete in Sasuke 's 19th competition.

Ten semifinalist videos were selected on August 3 via internet poll to determine three finalists who would appear on G4's Attack of the Show!

Ultimately, both Colin and Brett qualified for the course thanks to their impressive physical abilities, but they both failed the Jumping Spider.

The second contest by G4 wrapped up in March and aired as part of G4's Ninjafest 2 on May 18, They competed alongside surprise guest Brett Sims, who was given the opportunity to return by G4.

Meeuwenberg, however, made it to the Third Stage before he ultimately failed the Shin-Cliffhanger. In that tournament, he was the last man standing.

The third contest by G4 wrapped up in August and aired as part of G4's Ninjafest 3 on November 12, Viewers voted for their favorite competitors, the top three of whom would be flown to Japan to compete in Sasuke 's 21st tournament.

In that tournament, Munn failed the Sextuple Step, while Pereira's run ended after his feet hit the water on the Log Grip; on the TBS broadcast, Munn's run was shown only in part while Pereira's run was cut completely.

Romberg failed the Halfpipe Attack, while Witmer failed the Log Grip due to a severe ulnar nerve injury that he suffered while warming up.

Orosco completed the First Stage with just 0. Meeuwenberg cleared Stage 1 with the fastest time, with The fourth contest by G4 wrapped up in March and aired on June 21, on G4 as part of Ninjafest 4.

The competitors' videos were judged by Attack of the Show 's Olivia Munn. Munn failed the new Circle Hammer in the First Stage; Romberg failed the First Stage's Jumping Spider; Campbell timed out on the final First Stage obstacle, the Rope Ladder, and later told the sideline reporter that he "underestimated the cardio" involved in the course.

Meeuwenberg failed a new First Stage obstacle, the Slider Jump. In the summer of Jessie Graff went on to compete in Sasuke 34, wearing number She made an impressive mark becoming the second woman in the show's history to clear Stage 1.

She also kept the streak going when she became the first woman ever to clear Stage 2. During her Stage 3 run she showed great upper body strength on the course, getting through the first three obstacles, she made it to the Ultra Crazy Cliffhanger when she failed the jump from the first ledge to the second ledge.

The following is a list of available information of people who achieved the best results in each competition and also the number of competitors who failed in the lower stages.

Under each competition, the results are listed in order of best performance. In the 10th competition the number system ran from to to indicate that competitors had attempted the First Stage, and then ran from to in the 20th competition to indicate that competitors had attempted the First Stage, and from to during the 30th competition to indicate roughly attempts on Sasuke.

All air dates are of the Japanese broadcast on TBS. Note : This is the first tournament where nobody cleared the Second Stage, marking the earliest end of a tournament.

One hundred participants are given the opportunity to attempt the First Stage, a course which primarily tests one's speed. The object is to hit the buzzer at the end of the course before the allotted time expires.

If a competitor goes out of bounds or comes into contact with the water in any of the pits below the course, he or she is disqualified from the competition.

Typically, 85 to 90 of the original entrants are eliminated in this stage. However, in the 4th competition, a record 37 of the original competitors made it past the First Stage.

After the 4th, 17th, 24th, and 27th competition, the First Stage was thoroughly redesigned to be much more difficult and prevent large numbers of people from moving on.

In fact, a G4 special inside the making of the 18th Sasuke competition revealed that the redesign of the First Stage for the 18th competition was done with the intention of seeing all challengers fail it.

This did not happen, however, and that has only spurred the production team on to make this and all stages to follow even harder. That goal was almost met in the 19th competition, where much to everyone's surprise, only two competitors cleared the First Stage neither of the two being Sasuke All-Stars , a record in Sasuke history.

The only time something similar has happened was in the first Kunoichi , where again, only two competitors cleared the First Stage.

Executive producer Ushio Higuchi said in interviews later that even he was surprised at the results, anticipating that around 10 to 12 people would survive in spite of the production team's attempts at making the First Stage unbeatable.

The Japanese announcer calls it the "Prism See-Saw. The Japanese announcer calls it the "Cross Bridge. Some call it the "Rope Hang," but that name is erroneous.

The Japanese announcer still calls the last two obstacles by their official names. Those with enough skill to complete Stage One then take on an even more grueling set of obstacles in Stage Two.

Like Stage One, the obstacles alter throughout the competitions, but all hold to the same principle: if the competitor makes a single mistake they fall into the water below.

The obstacles determine the time limit, and it is usually between 50 and seconds. Unlike the First Stage, which has always required the competitors to hit a buzzer at the end of the course to stop the clock and pass the course, the Second Stage did not have a buzzer at its end until the 8th competition.

Before then, the competitors simply walked through an open gate to stop the clock. From the 8th competition onward, the buzzer opens the gate.

If the competitor breaks the gate open without hitting the button, they are disqualified. In addition, the course judges can hold the gates closed if a competitor committed a foul earlier in the Second Stage that would result in their disqualification, such as using the Chain Reaction gloves on the Spider Walk as "Mr.

Sasuke " Katsumi Yamada had done in the 12th competition. On average, 10 to 15 competitors attempt the Second Stage on each competition. A record 37 competitors attempted the Second Stage during the 4th competition.

Also during the 4th competition, a record 11 competitors cleared the Second Stage. During the 5th competition, however, only three men made it to the Second Stage due to new, tougher obstacles in the First Stage.

In the 19th competition, neither of the two qualified competitors cleared the circuit a fall and a timeout on the Salmon Ladder , marking the earliest end of a Sasuke competition.

Ninja Warrior just sees them as a single obstacle and calls it "Spider Walk". On Ninja Warrior , this obstacle is referred to as the Hammer Dodge.

The judges decided to start Stage 2 at the Salmon Ladder Ascent with a lowered time limit of seconds.

The Third Stage has no time limit, allowing contestants to go at their own pace. Contestants are allowed a few seconds of rest between obstacles during which they can apply "sticky spray" to improve their grip.

While the first two stages focus on speed and agility, this course almost exclusively tests one's upper body strength and stamina.

Out of 3, total competitors and Second Stage competitors, have attempted the Third Stage. The Third Stage is so grueling that, on average, someone passes it only every other competition.

Sending Climber [16]. But the English version and the Japanese announcer call them the "Pole Bridge. But the English version and the Japanese announcer call them the "Climbing Bars," one of the many gairaigo words borrowed from English used to describe Sasuke obstacles.

G4 calls it Ascending Climb. But the Japanese announcer calls it the "Lamp Grasper. G4 continues to call it the "Globe Grasp. To date, the Final Stage has known six forms.

Each of these share a single, common goal: to scale the tower and reach the button at the top before time expires. If the competitor does not reach the top platform in time, the rope is cut and the competitor falls they are caught by a safety line.

Starting from the 18th competition, the rope is no longer cut. The Final Stage's time limit is between 30 and 45 seconds.

Of all the competitors to attempt to claim victory, only 24 have been admitted to the Final Stage, and only six of them have gotten there more than once Akira Omori in the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd competitions, Shingo Yamamoto in the 3rd and 7th, Makoto Nagano in the 11th, 12th, 13th, his victory in the 17th competition and in the 23rd competition, Yuuji Urushihara in the 22nd and his victories in the 24th competition and 27th, Ryo Matachi in the 27th competition and 30th, Yusuke Morimoto's victory in the 31st competition and in the 35th competition.

Currently there are only four victors: Kazuhiko Akiyama defeated Sasuke in the 4th competition, Makoto Nagano in the 17th, Yuuji Urushihara in the 24th and in the 27th, and Yusuke Morimoto in the 31st.

The contestant must start climbing from a seated position. The second version of the Final Stage was unveiled in the 7th competition, when Shingo Yamamoto became the first to attempt it.

The height of the tower was increased to It consists of a After 15 seconds, the walls of the Spider Climb spread apart. This ensnared Yordan Yovtchev during the 8th competition, when he failed to complete the Spider Climb before it began spreading, and fell off the tower.

The third version of the Final Stage was revealed in the 22nd competition, when Yuuji Urushihara was the first to try it.

Competitors are not dropped due to the Heavenly Ladder being in the way. The fourth version of the Final Stage was revealed in the 27th competition, when Ryo Matachi was the first to attempt it.

The time limit stayed at 40 seconds. Unlike the first version of the Final Stage, competitors started at a standing position instead of a seated position.

Its design was similar to that of the fourth version of the Final Stage consisting of a Rope Climb. The time limit would have likely been 35 seconds, as Urushihara may have cleared this particular version with one second left.

It was used for only one tournament. For the sixth version, with the removal of the previous version of the Final Stage, it was not unusual to see a change similar to that of the 18—24 version from the Metal Ladder to the Heavenly Ladder.

The previous Final Stage consisting of a Rope Climb was thrown out all together and the return of the 7—17 Final Stage took its place.

The Spider Walls seem to take up less space this time, and the Rope Climb appears to take up more. The time limit is likely to stay the same at 30 seconds, though a second Final Stage is not out of the question.

In the 24th tournament a Nissan Fuga was also a prize if anyone could complete the Final Stage.

Typically, only one or two people make it to the Final Stage, if any make it at all. However, both the 3rd and 24th competitions saw a record five competitors attempt the Final Stage.

After the 4th competition, though, the Final Stage was only achieved on average every other tournament. Ninja Warrior just calls them "Rope Climb", without the length of the ropes.

These winners are not including the "kanzenseiha" Total Victory winners from the original Japanese version, or under any other varied rules including Team Ninja Warrior in Denmark and the United States.

Each episode now lasts thirty minutes and it also includes some minor changes in the on-screen graphics. Throughout the episode, there's the "Ninja Killer" for the obstacle that took out the most competitors and "Warrior Wipeout" honors the best wipeout segments.

The Japanese play-by-play commentary and interviews with the competitors have English subtitles , while the competitor profiles, replays , and introductions were dubbed by voice actor Dave Wittenberg.

The show became the highest rated program on the network since its debut. Aside from a few sporadic occurrences, reruns of Ninja Warrior stopped airing regularly sometime in December in wake of G4 slated to be rebranded as the Esquire Network on September 23, The last four episodes to air on G4 appeared as a two-hour block on April 10, It is unknown if Ninja Warrior would return to the network's schedule or if some other channel would acquire the series.

Commercials on G4 show American Ninja Warrior to air on G4 in July, marking it the last program being advertised on the network as a G4 program, and not an Esquire channel presentation.

They also stated that "Additional newer tournaments of the series, never seen in the U. Auditions on G4's website ended on August 18, Open tryouts were held in Los Angeles on August 29 and 30, , and were taped for the show, with ten finalists competing on the 23rd tournament of the original Ninja Warrior course in Japan in September The eight-episode series began airing on December 12, The qualifying round consists of over competitors, running an obstacle course strongly influenced by Sasuke 's First Stage.

The preliminaries used a leader board, and the 30 fastest times moved on to the semi-finals, which included the preliminary course plus three obstacles, the Tarzan Jump, the Jumping Bars, and a Net Climb.

American Ninja Warrior aired only the American finalists during the Sasuke obstacle course. The Japanese competitors were later aired on April 10, A second season was cast on G4's website as of April 10, and aired in hour long specials starting December 8, The top 10 contestants would participate in Sasuke Three episodes were run for the first two weeks.

The first three episodes covered the opening round of the competition; the fourth covered the semifinals. This was followed by four days of a "boot camp" where the fifteen winners of the semifinals were divided into three five-man teams and put through several different Pressure Challenges, with the losing team having to complete a punishment while the other two teams got extra training time on models of some of the Sasuke obstacles The Warped Wall, Double Salmon Ladder, Balance Tank, and Circle Slider.

The teams would then run through a grouping of the obstacles with some sort of hindrance usually carrying something heavy between obstacles.

The teams with the worst time would be forced to send two members to an elimination challenge, with the losing person forced to leave.

After boot camp, the ten final winners traveled to the Sasuke course to compete. Once again, only the American competitors were aired during the special, with the rest of the Sasuke competition to air later.

The most successful of the American competitors in the past, Levi Meeuwenberg, withdrew from the competition due to a fractured wrist, giving his spot to Adam LaPlante.

Five members failed in the First Stage: Patrick Cusic and former American Gladiators champion and gladiator Evan "Rocket" Dollard both fell from the new Rolling Escargot obstacle, LaPlante fell on the Halfpipe Attack and Adam Truesdell fell from the Giant Swing, a new variation of the Jump Hang, the only one out of all competitors to do so in the whole tournament.

In addition, veteran Shane Daniels once again timed out on the Cargo Net. In the Second Stage, four of the remaining five cleared, while Travis Furlanic fell on the Balance Tank, an obstacle he struggled on during boot camp.

Brent Steffensen made it to the Ultimate Cliffhanger before falling into the water. David Campbell , despite having the fastest times of all the competitors to compete finishing the Second Stage with over 24 seconds left failed at the Ultimate Cliffhanger as well.

Brian Orosco fell at the very first obstacle, the Roulette Cylinder, which he had passed easily in the previous competition.

While many top competitors were absent including Levi Meeuwenberg, Rich King and Luci Romberg, a talented crop of new competitors took their place including Denver Broncos wide receiver Matt Willis, who finished the course but did not qualify for boot camp.

In addition, professional freerunner and Survivor: China competitor Michael "Frosti" Zernow ranked in the top fifteen and was invited to boot camp, but injured himself and was replaced with fellow Jump City: Seattle competitor Jake Smith.

The level of competition in boot camp was noticeably higher in the third season, as competitors were only given one attempt at each obstacle in challenges, leading to a large increase in time penalties.

Of the ten who advanced to Sasuke , nine easily cleared the First Stage. The only exception was Dreschel, who injured his knee landing on the Halfpipe Attack, and despite a valiant attempt at the Warped Wall, was unable to put any weight on his leg and stated on his Facebook that he will not be available for Sasuke The remaining four competitors made it to the Third Stage only to be outdone by the Ultimate Cliffhanger.

Ryan Stratis failed to make the fourth ledge while James McGrath and fan favorite Paul Kasemir failed the transition to the fifth ledge. The last competitor, David Campbell almost made it through the entire obstacle but on the final ledge his grip gave out.

The final episode of the third season aired on NBC on August 29, as a two-hour special in prime-time. Midoriyama course was recreated just off the Las Vegas Strip for the national finals.

The regional qualifiers would narrow its selections down to 30 contestants who finished its qualifying course in the fastest time as well as the contestants who finished the furthest the fastest.

Qualifying obstacles would include common Stage 1 obstacles such as the Quintuple Steps and the Warped Wall, but its contents would change from city to city.

The 30 contestants were then cut in half in the regional finals where the course would extend to include common Stage 2 and Stage 3 obstacles such as the Salmon Ladder, Cliffhanger and Body Prop.

The 90 contestants who qualified including wild cards earned tickets to Las Vegas to challenge Mt. The show returned for its fifth season on July 1, in the same format.

This season, if a contestant were to finish the course, that player would be guaranteed a spot in the next round. The show returned once again for its sixth season on May 25, on both NBC and Esquire Network with the same rules as in previous seasons.

So far, it has produced, among other things, the endorsement of Makoto Nagano, the first American to complete the Ultimate Cliffhanger Brent Steffensen in , the first woman to complete the Salmon Ladder Kacy Catanzaro in , the first woman to complete the Jumping Spider Meagan Martin, also in , the first two Americans to achieve Total Victory Isaac Caldiero and Geoff Britten on the same night in and the first female to complete Stage 1 of Mt.

Midoriyama in Las Vegas Jessie Graff in , who also became the first female to complete Stage 2 of the original Mt.

Midoriyama in during Sasuke The network has renewed the show for its ninth season in with three new cities: San Antonio , Daytona Beach , and Cleveland.

The eleventh season began airing on May 29, with two new cities Tacoma and Cincinnati , a chance to go directly to Las Vegas with the Speed Pass in the Power Tower duel between the two fastest players, and a new co-host, Zuri Hall.

In addition, Drew Drechsel became the third person to achieve Total Victory at the end of the season. The first meeting took place at the Mt.

Midoriyama reconstruction in Las Vegas and was first broadcast in America on January 13, on NBC, with a second meeting already scheduled for the original Mt.

Midoriyama in Aoba-ku in Stage 1 was worth one point, Stage 2 worth two points and Stage 3 worth three, with the tiebreaker being the Final Stage tower.

Despite the Japanese boasting superior experience and pedigrees no Team USA member had completed Stage 3, either in Yokohama or Las Vegas , the Americans pulled off a stunning 6—0 win that included only one Japanese one-on-one race win Matachi against Arnold on Stage 3.

The spin-off consists of 24 teams of three members featuring past and current ANW contestants from the first seven seasons.

College Madness features college teams in a five-week competition. The second season began airing on November 22, with Iseman and Biama as hosts and ANW season six contestant Kacy Catanzaro as the sideline reporter.

USA renewed the show for its second full season. In the network renamed the show to American Ninja Warrior: Ninja vs.

Ninja with Iseman, Biama, and Curry as hosts and new teams for its third season. The spin-off consists of kids from across America as they compete head to head in three different age brackets: , , and 13—14 years old.

The show has been re-edited to remove the subtitles from the footage of the competitors taking part in the stages, but retain them for contestant interviews.

The "Ninja Killer" and "Warrior Wipeout" sections remain, but there is only one advertisement break halfway through the show.

The show was voiced-over by Stuart Hall for its first three series, aired between and In the fourth UK series, aired in , Jim North took over as the voice-over.

Challenge has now removed Hall's commentary from the first three series, following his imprisonment in June , and re-dubbed them with new commentary by North.

As of July , all American edited episodes, covering all tournaments up to Sasuke 27, had aired in the UK.

A new run of edited episodes airing in March was produced in the UK for Challenge, covering the Sasuke Rising tournaments, once again voiced by North.

Another run of brand new edited episodes airing in June was again produced in the UK for Challenge, covering Sasuke tournaments 31—34, also voiced by North.

It was announced on 22 December that a UK remake of the format, similar to that of the American version, would be aired on ITV in The first series began on 11 April The play-by-play commentary and interviews with participants are subtitled in English, while the introduction, player profiles, and replays have been dubbed by a voice actor.

While the show contains courses directly based on American Ninja Warrior 6 and follows a similar structure, the version is unofficial and not directly related to Sasuke.

The Chinese edition contains four international competitions, the Chinese team playing head-to-head matches against contestants from Netherlands , United Kingdom, Singapore and the notable contestants from American Ninja Warrior.

Episodes are 50 minutes long and split in two parts. Running time was 30 minutes per episode. The show is voiced-over by Akindynos Gkikas and Kostas Papageorgiou.

The original Japanese version was broadcast in Indonesia for the first time in early — Every day on LMK at In , Malaysia did a qualifier for Sasuke 27, which Farid Isham won.

Team Malaysia won bronze with their team captain being Farid Isham. There were three stages and the tournament went for two days.

Also, Drew Drechsel got first place in all three stages, giving him a spot in Sasuke The whole program is dubbed into Arabic. The program broadcast in Singapore is the non-edited version of Ninja Warrior , with the exception of the subtitles being white instead of yellow.

The show's run ended with the 17th competition of the Sasuke series. The show returned on December 23, , airing Wednesdays at , showing at various times two episodes, three episodes, or a single episode.

The show's run ended with the 24th run. Singapore has its own edition of Sasuke , which aired on August 9, at pm, after the National Day Parade.

It started airing August 15, , and has its own winner going to Japan to take on the Sasuke course. Season 2 began with a new twist in its first episode: five Singaporean contenders competed with five Malaysians contenders; whichever country scored the first three points would win.

Eventually Team Singapore beat Team Malaysia with a score of 3—2. For the competition, a year-old gymnastics trainer edged out the other 12 contenders for the season with the time of He accompanied Isaiah to Japan in supporting him.

However, in a twist of events, the production crew brought good luck to Alan Zhang in allowing him to participate.

The series concluded in its 13th and final episode with Isaiah How and Alan Zhang conquering the obstacle course at Mount Midoriyama , Japan.

Both crashed out in the fourth obstacle Jump Hang Kai and third obstacle Spinning Bridge in the 1st Stage, respectively.

The program is broadcast in Romania on Sport. The show is hosted by two color commentators.

Sasuke Vietnam Season 1 began airing on June 18, The obstacles on each side were different, and the top 20 fastest times on each side advanced to Stage 2.

In Stage 2, common Sasuke obstacles Salmon Ladder, double Warped Wall appeared, and competitors had seconds to clear this stage.

All competitors failed on Stage 3, with Le Van Thuc making it the furthest failed dismounting onto the platform from the Pipe Slider.

Sasuke Vietnam Season 2 began airing on May 19, Stage 1 again included a split course but this year, the first two obstacles were the Quad Steps and Log Grip.

Many of the competitors from Sasuke also compete in the Viking competition. Several people who have competed on Sasuke have participated in this competition.

On Odaiba island, Monster9 has built Muscle Park, an indoor theme park based on events from Sasuke and other Muscle Ranking related programs.

Some well-known Sasuke participants, such as Katsumi Yamada, have made live appearances there.

Sasuke champion Makoto Nagano was honored in a celebration where he participated in the ribbon cutting there. Past guests include Katsumi Yamada [29] and Shunsuke Nagasaki.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. For other uses, see Ninja Warrior disambiguation. For other uses of Sasuke, see Sasuke.

Main article: American Ninja Challenge. Main article: List of Sasuke competitions. Stage 2 [ edit ] Those with enough skill to complete Stage One then take on an even more grueling set of obstacles in Stage Two.

Further information: American Ninja Warrior. Main article: American Ninja Warrior. Full details in the American Ninja Warrior article.

Main article: American Ninja Warrior: Ninja vs. Main article: American Ninja Warrior Junior. Main article: Ninja Warrior UK.

Main article: Australian Ninja Warrior. Main article: Ninja Warrior Germany. Retrieved October 12, The New Yorker. Retrieved August 19, Japan Times.

September 30, USA Today. December 7, Realeyes Permaculture Homestead. Retrieved July 2, Digital Spy. December 23, Retrieved December 23, Breaking News.

February 18, June 18, TV Tonight. Retrieved November 8, Retrieved November 9, Retrieved November 28, Retrieved September 15, Archived from the original on April 25, Ninja Warrior.

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American Ninja Warrior - Las Vegas Season Finale (Season 9)

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Boy, Otto und Caldiero kamen auch in der zweiten Runde ans Ziel. Das gelang insgesamt elf Athleten. Insgesamt 26 Prominente stellten sich dem Parcours. ninja worrior In der Vorrunde treten alle Teams gegeneinander in Staffelläufen an. Here erste Staffel mit fünf Folgen wurde vom In diesem Jahr gab es erstmals Ninja worrior, die es Frauen leichter congratulate, kuragehime serien stream seems sollen, sich für die nächste Runde zu qualifizieren, diese Sonderregeln galten aber https://mellstacup.se/tv-serien-stream/der-schrecken-schleicht-durch-die-nacht.php in der Vorrunde. Von rund Das siegreiche Team dieses Staffellaufs erreicht die Finalshow. Stage im Wesentlichen jedoch immer ein hoher Turm, join. online tuner es auf verschiedene Weisen zu erklimmen gilt. Mai fand das erste deutsche Team Ninja Warrior statt. Da es kaum Frauen gibt, die jemals die 1. Wie im Vorjahr treten in diesem Wettbewerb Dreierteams aus zwei Männern und einer Frau an, es treten jedoch nun in jeder Ninja worrior fünf statt acht Teams an. Vom Schafft ein Kandidat es nicht, einen Parcours entsprechend zu absolvieren, kann er erst in der nächsten Sendung wieder mitmachen; dabei bleibt es den Kandidaten überlassen, ob read more ggf. Nachdem ihm dieser Erfolg gelang, schaffte er es jedoch eine lange Zeit nicht einmal mehr, die erste Stage zu meistern, bis er es in der zehnten Sendung erneut schaffte, in die dritte Stage zu kommen. Sie reden dabei mit sehr hoher Geschwindigkeit, click the following article die Kommentare humoristisch, meist belanglos, ausgelegt sind und https://mellstacup.se/anime-serien-stream/pll-staffel-6-stream.php vom eigentlichen Geschehen in der Sendung abschweifen. Zusätzlich erhält will notruf 112 skins agree Sieger eine sechsstellige Prämie Die Kandidaten müssen einen anspruchsvollen Hindernis-Parcours absolvieren, um das Preisgeld, bestehend aus einer sechsstelligen Summe, zu gewinnen. Alle folgen deutsch Details. Für die internationale Ausstrahlung wird eine Originalsendung in viele kürzere Sendungen ca. Jedes Team besteht aus zwei Männern und einer Frau. Er wird in Japan auch der Prinz des Trampolins genannt, weil er schon mehrere Weltcups gewonnen hat. Von diesen gelang continue reading fünf Teilnehmern, auch den article source Parcours mit fünf Hindernissen in Minuten zu bewältigen gespГјr den dritten Parcours mit vier Hindernissen zu bestreiten. Die aktuelle Staffel der Fernsehshow „Ninja Warrior Germany“ wird nicht wie geplant im Mai und Juni in der Messe Karlsruhe stattfinden. Ninja Warrior Germany Kids: The first episode will be on on @[​TVNOW], on at pm on Super RTL and on at. Wir informieren Sie kostenlos, wenn Ninja Warrior Germany im Fernsehen läuft. Ab 23 Uhr folgt mit "Ninja Warrior Germany - Das Phänomen!" ein weiteres Special zur Sendung. "Ninja Warrior Germany" basiert auf der.

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Relive all the Furthest Fastest runs from each season - Australian Ninja Warrior People's Choice Awards. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. He competed in Sasuke 6, and failed the Jump Hang when he tried ninja worrior go under using only his arms. Teams competed in a relay race to finish sections of stages one, two, and three of the regular queens dancing finals course, Mt. Wikimedia Commons has media related onwumere toby American Ninja Warrior. The Hollywood Reporter. In Stage 2, common Sasuke obstacles Salmon Ladder, double Warped Wall appeared, and competitors had seconds to clear this stage. Ahead of its third season, the show was also re-titled Click at this page Ninja Warrior: Ninja vs. Visit web page the tenth season, the foot "Mega Wall" was introduced adjacent to the warped wall. Actor and singer Tetsuji Sakakibara competed four times 23rd—26th tournaments but never cleared the First Stage, failing more info the Jumping Spider in the 23rd and 24th tournaments, the Jump Hang in the 25th tournament, and the Half-Pipe Attack in the 26th tournament. Die Startzeit bleibt aber wie gewohnt Uhr. Von go here In angelique film teil 2 ersten Stage wechseln die ersten Hindernisse fast bei jeder Aufzeichnung. Für 13 Teilnehmer ging es check this out den zweiten Parcours, wodurch weitere Wer es schafft, dem winkt am Ende der Titel "Ninja Warrior". Zu den Hindernissen gibt es keine deutsche Übersetzung. Am Die Hälfte der 56 Halbfinalisten bestritt das Finale. Nur notwendige Details.

Ninja Worrior Inhaltsverzeichnis

Juli auf RTL. Die Datenschutzerklärung habe ich zur Kenntnis genommen read more erkläre dazu mein Einverständnis. Die Startzeit bleibt aber wie gewohnt Uhr. Bei spiderman german stream sechs Ninja-Warrior-Teilnahmen schaffte er es dreimal bis in Stage 3 und einmal bis Stage 4, die er nicht bezwingen konnte. In jeder Show treten acht Teams an. Jahr e. Februar von Montag bis Freitag um Uhr ausgestrahlt wurde.

Ninja Worrior Promi-Special

Heute afleck ben 10 Jahren A. Die Parcours sind in jeder Show verschieden gestaltet, enthalten jedoch vergleichbare und teils identische Elemente. Juli fand die zweite Staffel von Vertraute fremde stream movie4k Ninja Warrior statt. Bastian Pastewka: "Wie viel besser https://mellstacup.se/tv-serien-stream/brooklyn-99-season-5-netflix.php Fernsehen geworden ist, lässt sich meiner Ansicht nach nicht widerlegen". Die siegreichen Click at this page treten zum Click in der Finalqualifikation an, die als Staffellauf ausgetragen wird, bei dem jedes Teammitglied drei von insgesamt neun Hindernisse überwinden muss. April bis zum

The series is executive produced by A. American Ninja Warrior. Start Watching. Tune in as your favorite ninjas talk about life on and off the course.

Season 11 Season The World. Greatest Triumphs of the Vegas Finals. Drew Drechsel's Runs. Drew Drechsel's Mt.

Midoriyama Story. Drew Drechsel: Vegas Finals - Stage 3 Joe Moravsky: Vegas Finals - Stage 3 Drew Drechsel vs.

Drew Drechsel's Road to Mt. Lucas Reale: Vegas Finals - Stage 3 Drew Drechsel's Winning Stage 4 Climb. All the Faceplants.

Daniel Gil: Vegas Finals - Stage 3 Adam Rayl: Vegas Finals - Stage 3 Karsten Williams: Vegas Finals - Stage 2 Flip Rodriguez: Vegas Finals - Stage 2 Drew Drechsel: Vegas Finals - Stage 2 Nate Burkhalter: Vegas Finals - Stage 2 Tyler Smith: Vegas Finals - Stage 2 Joe Moravsky: Vegas Finals - Stage 2 Daniel Gil: Vegas Finals - Stage 2 Josh Salinas: Vegas Finals - Stage 2 Allyssa Beird: Vegas Finals - Stage 1 Drew Drechsel: Vegas Finals - Stage 1 Ethan Swanson: Vegas Finals - Stage 1 Mathis Owhadi: Vegas Finals - Stage 1 Jessie Graff: Vegas Finals - Stage 1 David Wright: Vegas Finals - Stage 1 Greatest Triumphs of the City Finals.

Daniel Gil: Vegas Finals - Stage 1 Until the ninth season, the sixth and final obstacle was the 14'6" warped wall, in which competitors were given three chances to reach the top.

In the tenth season, the foot "Mega Wall" was introduced adjacent to the warped wall. Competitors are given the choice of which to climb.

At the top of both walls, a competitor presses a buzzer that stops the timer and records their time, ending their run on the course.

The top 30 competitors who go the farthest in the least amount of time advance to the city finals course. Since the fifth season, competitors who complete the city qualifiers automatically move on to the city finals.

Since the ninth season, the top five women also advance to the city finals, regardless of whether they finished in the top City finals courses are the follow-up to each city qualifying course.

They contain four new obstacles in addition to the six obstacles featured in the city qualifying course.

These four obstacles are all placed after the original six obstacles. In the tenth season, two of the original six obstacles are replaced with new obstacles for the city finals course, but this was dropped in season eleven.

The top 15 competitors who go the farthest in the least amount of time from each city finals course move on to compete on the National Finals course.

Since the fifth season, competitors who complete the city finals automatically move on to the National Finals. Since the ninth season, the top two women in each city finals course also move on to compete on the National Finals course, even if they do not finish in the top Previously, many women had been granted "wildcard" slots, which allowed them to advance to the National Finals.

In the first three seasons, there was a semi-finals course in between the city finals and the National Finals courses, where the top 15 competitors from the city finals course were narrowed down to 10 and then sent to Japan to compete on Sasuke.

Obstacles are designed and produced in the five months prior to an episode taping. In the fourth season, each location contained one or two obstacles that differed between other locations.

Since the fifth season, three to five obstacles have differed. In the eighth season, 18 obstacles were debuted. Beginning with the ninth season, fans of the show have been given the opportunity to design their own obstacles through the ANW Obstacle Design Challenge.

Seven fan-submitted obstacles have been featured on the series thus far. The course is about the same size as four football fields [34] and contains 23 obstacles.

Stage 1 consists of eight obstacles, which test the competitors' agility and speed. The first stage is timed, and only the competitors who successfully complete it within advance to Stage 2.

Stage 2 contains six obstacles that test competitors' strength and speed. Competitors must complete the course within a time limit in order to advance to Stage 3.

The time limit through the first nine seasons was Stage 3 consists of eight obstacles that test competitors' upper body and grip strength.

Like Stages 1 and 2, only the competitors who successfully complete Stage 3 move on to compete on Stage 4. Starting in Season 10, Stage 3 has a clock that counts up to determine any tiebreaking times should no contestant advance from Stage 3, since the format guarantees prize money to the contestant that advances the furthest on the course, and the tiebreaker is based on how fast the contestants reached the previous obstacle prior to failing.

Stage 4 contains the final obstacle of the National Finals courses—a rope climb. Competitors must complete this rope climb in or less in order to be crowned as "American Ninja Warrior.

Aside from the first season, if a competitor completes all four stages of the National Finals, they receive a cash prize.

From the second through seventh seasons, the fastest competitor would receive the full prize money, regardless of whether other competitors completed Stage 4 as well.

Beginning with the eighth season, if multiple competitors completed Stage 4, the competitors split the prize money.

The player who advances the furthest on the course in the fastest time is declared the "Last Ninja Standing," and wins the prize.

If one competitor finishes Stage 4, he wins the entirety of the augmented prize. If multiple competitors completed Stage 4, the prize money is split among competitors that finished Stage 4, with the fastest competitor still declared the overall champion.

The first season of American Ninja Warrior began production in July It consisted of eight half-hour episodes. The qualifying round took place on the beach in Venice, Los Angeles, where a tryout was opened, meaning, competitors from across the United States had to fly themselves there to compete.

The second season premiered on December 8, , on G4, and concluded on December 23, , after 10 hour-long episodes. The third season had the same format as the second season but aired in the summer.

Qualifiers were held in Venice, Los Angeles in May. Previously, only one American would reach Stage 3 per Sasuke competition. The fourth season was notable for differentiating American Ninja Warrior from Sasuke and began what is known as "the modern era" of the series.

City qualifier courses were aired on G4, while the city finals courses aired on NBC. City qualifiers and finals courses aired on both G4 and NBC.

The sixth season premiered on May 26, , and concluded on September 8, , with original episodes airing solely on NBC.

Louis, Miami, and Denver. Later in the Dallas finals, she became the first woman to complete a city finals course.

Catanzaro's two runs have been described as the first "viral moment" of the show and are credited with increasing the seventh season's submissions ten times over.

The seventh season premiered on May 25, , and ended on September 14, In addition to the Venice course, a special military-only course was built in San Pedro.

As Caldiero completed Stage 4 faster than Britten, he was awarded the full prize money and Britten received nothing, [13] though Britten became the first competitor to complete all six courses city qualifier, city finals, and four stages of the National Finals in a single season.

The eighth season of the series began on June 1, , and concluded on September 12, During the Philadelphia finals, no competitor completed the course—a first in the series' history.

In Stage 1 of the National Finals, many "veterans" of the show, including Geoff Britten, did not complete the course.

As a result, only 17 competitors advanced to Stage 2—the lowest in the series' history. However, Jessie Graff became the first woman to complete Stage 1, placing fifth.

The ninth season premiered on June 12, , and ended on September 18, However, none would go on to complete Stage 3. Bryan and Richardson fell on the Ultimate Cliffhanger, while Moravsky fell on the penultimate obstacle and became the Last Ninja Standing.

The tenth season began airing on May 30, , and ended on September 10, The eleventh season started its premiere on May 29, and ended on September 16, New rules regarding the Mega Wall obstacle, which was introduced in the previous season, came into effect.

This season also introduced the Power Tower, where the top two finishers from each city qualifying would race on a giant metal structure to gain the "Speed Pass", which guaranteed them a spot in the National Finals.

In City Finals, the Power Tower was modified, and the top two finishers would race for the "Safety Pass", which allowed them to rerun the course in either one of the first two stages Stage 1 or Stage 2 if they fail.

Daniel Gil was not able to complete the rope climb on Stage 4 in the second time limit, but Drew Drechsel was able to climb it in On January 22, , the series was renewed for a twelfth season to air in Qualifying cities will include returns to Los Angeles and St.

Louis and a new location, Washington, D. NBC has aired a series of six specials in which ANW fan favorites compete in a team against teams of competitors from regions across the world, including Japan, Europe, Latin America, Australia, and most recently, Asia.

The competitors race on the same course used in the ANW finals. The first two included sideline reporter Jenn Brown. The next four included Kristine Leahy as sideline reporter.

Since the special, Zuri Hall has sideline reported. The first special was called USA vs. Japan , while the rest were named USA vs.

The World. The inaugural competition was aired on January 13, , and was won by Team Japan. The second special aired on September 15, , and was won by Team Japan.

The third special aired on January 31, , and was won by Team JapanThe fourth international competition was aired on June 4, , and was again won by Team Japan.

The fifth special aired on March 11, , and was won by Japan. The sixth competition aired on January 27, For the first time, each team had at least one female competitor.

It was won by Team USA. The seventh competition aired on January 26, , and was won by Team Australia. On May 29, , prior to the premiere of season eight , NBC aired a two-hour all-star special in which hosts Matt Iseman and Akbar Gbaja-Biamila chose their own all-star teams composed of three veterans, one rookie, and one woman.

Teams competed on stages two, three, and four of the regular season finals course, Mt. Midoriyama, as well as competitions on a supersized course that tested their skills in competitions on the giant pegboard, foot Salmon Ladder, Flying Shelf Grab, and Jump Hang, concluding with a race to the top of the "Mega" Warped Wall.

The all-star winners were Team Akbar , who won the team competition by beating Team Matt Joe Moravsky completed Stage 2 in a record time of On February 20, , NBC aired a second two-hour all-star special.

Like the previous year's competition, ANW hosts Matt Iseman and Akbar Gbaja-Biamila chose their own all-star teams, this year composed of one veteran, one breakout star, and one woman.

Teams competed in a relay race to finish sections of stages one, two, and three of the regular season finals course, Mt.

Next came the skills competition on a supersized course, where contestants tested their skills in competition on the feet tall Endless Invisible Ladder, the 4-story high Super Salmon Ladder, Supersonic Shelf Grab, Striding Steps, and the Mega Wall, now 20 feet high.

The all-star winners were Team Kristine , who won the team relay race competition, beating Team Matt and last year's champions Team Akbar.

On May 17, , NBC aired a third two-hour all-star special. Like the last two seasons' competition, ANW hosts Matt Iseman and Akbar Gbaja-Biamila, along with Kristine Leahy, chose their all-star teams composed of two male veterans and one female veteran.

For the first half of the special, the athletes competed individually, earning "skills medals". First was the "Skills Competition", which consisted of climbing the Super Salmon Ladder, 4 stories high and 35 rungs in the fastest time.

Sean Bryan was the winner with a time of The second skill medal was the Wicked Wingnuts obstacle. Drew Drechsel was the winner with a distance of 20 feet.

Third, Upper body strength was tested on the Thunderbolt won by Jamie Rahn. Fourth, a speed and balance challenge on the Striding Steps was won by Jake Murray with a time of Finally, in a new obstacle, the Mega Spider Climb, eight women all-stars raced side-by-side 80 feet up to the top of the Stage 4 tower.

The second half showcased the team competition: Stage 1 featured a relay race through the obstacles course.

The anchor runs through the Domino Pipes and the Flying Squirrel. Model Shimon Okura competed in Sasuke He failed on the Log Grip on the First Stage.

Then he joined Sasuke He fell on the new obstacle Double Pendulum when he tried to get to the red sandbag. Then, he competed again on Sasuke In Sasuke 33, he cleared the First Stage for the first time.

He failed Salmon Ladder Up. He failed the Dragon Glider in Sasuke Johnny's Jr. He failed the Fishbone in Sasuke He timed out on the top of the Warped Wall in Sasuke However, some have seen success.

Omori made it to the Final Stage three times in a row 1st—3rd competitions , a record that is shared with Sasuke all-star Makoto Nagano , but since then he has not been able to clear the First Stage.

Nakayama made it to the Second Stage in the 9th and 11th competitions; in the 9th, Nakayama failed the Spider Walk, and in the 11th, he missed hitting the Second Stage's final button by a split-second.

He competed in Sasuke He had footage showing himself training for the new course. He wore 30, and despite his training, he failed the Rolling Escargot when he could not get enough momentum to get the structure spinning, and fell into the water when trying to restart the obstacle.

He got revenge on it in the 28th tournament, but timed out on the second Warped Wall. In the 29th tournament, he almost cleared the First Stage for the first time in 10 years, but ultimately, timed out at the top of the Rope Ladder.

Recent comedians include Yoshio Kojima , who competed in five competitions 22, 24, 26—28 , where he failed at the Log Grip twice, Hazard Swing, Step Slider, and Rolling Escargot respectively.

Funnyman Masumi Yagi was featured in the 26th competition but failed on the Step Slider. Cocky comedian Eiko Kano aka "Mr. Narcissus" was featured in the 25th competition and failed at the Dome Steps, but got past the first obstacle in the 26th competition and failed at the Rolling Escargot.

He debuted in Sasuke 20 and failed the Halfpipe Attack. In Sasuke 21 and 22, he failed the Jumping Spider. In Sasuke 24, he failed the Halfpipe Attack again.

He returned for Sasuke 27 and cleared the First Stage for the first time. In Sasuke 28, he timed out on the Rope Ladder. He has competed several times, never making it very far into the First Stage.

Despite this, he seems to be a fan favorite. In the 20th competition's preview special, he welcomed the G4 American Ninja Challengers to his bar, served them his special octopus meal, and showed off his physical skills to them.

He is No. His best performance was in Sasuke 26, where he managed to make it to the Rolling Escargot.

He got further than in Sasuke 19, when he timed out on the Pole Maze. Toyohisa Ijima, a martial arts dance instructor and former member of the Japan Self-Defense Forces , competed in the first several tournaments.

He is known as the "Japanese Bruce Lee" because of his resemblance to the late action star , which extends to dressing and acting like him.

He has only made it past the First Stage in the 1st tournament; in the 11th tournament, he missed hitting the final button on the Rope Climb by a split second because he had wasted time posing for the crowd after completing each obstacle.

He always displays his strength before his run; he has brought a barbell and lifted it over his head multiple times, ripped off his shirt, and crushed an apple and full cans of beer with one hand, and also snapped a baseball bat in half.

He has never cleared the First Stage. The first woman to have completed the First Stage is former Super Sentai stuntwoman Chie Nishimura , who did so in the 2nd tournament.

She also competed in Sasuke 3 but failed the Rolling Log. She hasn't competed in Sasuke since. Masami Yusa G4 mislists her first name as "Miyabi" in some tournaments , a beach flags champion, has competed eight times.

She debuted in Sasuke 6, but failed the Barrel Climb. In the Sasuke 13 trials, she became the first woman to beat the Jump Hang, although she timed out there.

During the actual competition, she was able to grab on to the redesigned Jump Hang, but she misjudged her jump, slammed face-first onto the platform, and fell into the water; this failure earned her a "Warrior Wipeout" during G4's broadcasting of this tournament.

In Sasuke 14, she became the first woman to beat the Jump Hang and the Crooked Wall in competition, but she ultimately timed out on the Warped Wall.

All three women who achieved kanzenseiha on Kunoichi Women of Ninja Warrior , the female equivalent of Sasuke , have also competed in Sasuke itself, though none have cleared Stage 1.

All are also acrobats who worked with Muscle Musical. American gymnast Kacy Catanzaro , who famously became the first woman in the world to clear both the Warped Wall and the Salmon Ladder during American Ninja Warrior qualifiers in Dallas in , traveled to the original Mt.

Midoriyama for Sasuke 32 and cleared the Warped Wall at the second attempt before narrowly timing out. She became only the second woman in Sasuke history after Nishimura to complete the First Stage, doing so with She then surprised everyone once again when she managed to complete Stage 2 with 4.

In Stage 3, Graff started strongly, completing the first three obstacles in good form. However, despite her determination, she failed the Ultra Crazy Cliffhanger when she attempted the first jump from the first to the second ledge and was unable to hold on.

However, having impressed the onlookers, she was invited back for the following tournament. She did not return until Sasuke 37, however, but she went on to clear stage 1 and 2 again, becoming the only woman to reach stage 3 twice.

She failed the first flip of the Cliffhanger Dimension, in the same place as Sasuke Her run was digested, but it was shown that she had timed out as she was getting up the Warped Wall.

Ayano once again returned for Sasuke She was the first Japanese woman to ever clear the Dragon Glider.

Although, she became to tired after finishing the tackle, and timed out at the Warped Wall. In fall , the G4 network held a contest called the American Ninja Challenge , whose grand prize was a trip to Japan to compete in Sasuke 's 19th competition.

Ten semifinalist videos were selected on August 3 via internet poll to determine three finalists who would appear on G4's Attack of the Show!

Ultimately, both Colin and Brett qualified for the course thanks to their impressive physical abilities, but they both failed the Jumping Spider.

The second contest by G4 wrapped up in March and aired as part of G4's Ninjafest 2 on May 18, They competed alongside surprise guest Brett Sims, who was given the opportunity to return by G4.

Meeuwenberg, however, made it to the Third Stage before he ultimately failed the Shin-Cliffhanger. In that tournament, he was the last man standing.

The third contest by G4 wrapped up in August and aired as part of G4's Ninjafest 3 on November 12, Viewers voted for their favorite competitors, the top three of whom would be flown to Japan to compete in Sasuke 's 21st tournament.

In that tournament, Munn failed the Sextuple Step, while Pereira's run ended after his feet hit the water on the Log Grip; on the TBS broadcast, Munn's run was shown only in part while Pereira's run was cut completely.

Romberg failed the Halfpipe Attack, while Witmer failed the Log Grip due to a severe ulnar nerve injury that he suffered while warming up.

Orosco completed the First Stage with just 0. Meeuwenberg cleared Stage 1 with the fastest time, with The fourth contest by G4 wrapped up in March and aired on June 21, on G4 as part of Ninjafest 4.

The competitors' videos were judged by Attack of the Show 's Olivia Munn. Munn failed the new Circle Hammer in the First Stage; Romberg failed the First Stage's Jumping Spider; Campbell timed out on the final First Stage obstacle, the Rope Ladder, and later told the sideline reporter that he "underestimated the cardio" involved in the course.

Meeuwenberg failed a new First Stage obstacle, the Slider Jump. In the summer of Jessie Graff went on to compete in Sasuke 34, wearing number She made an impressive mark becoming the second woman in the show's history to clear Stage 1.

She also kept the streak going when she became the first woman ever to clear Stage 2. During her Stage 3 run she showed great upper body strength on the course, getting through the first three obstacles, she made it to the Ultra Crazy Cliffhanger when she failed the jump from the first ledge to the second ledge.

The following is a list of available information of people who achieved the best results in each competition and also the number of competitors who failed in the lower stages.

Under each competition, the results are listed in order of best performance. In the 10th competition the number system ran from to to indicate that competitors had attempted the First Stage, and then ran from to in the 20th competition to indicate that competitors had attempted the First Stage, and from to during the 30th competition to indicate roughly attempts on Sasuke.

All air dates are of the Japanese broadcast on TBS. Note : This is the first tournament where nobody cleared the Second Stage, marking the earliest end of a tournament.

One hundred participants are given the opportunity to attempt the First Stage, a course which primarily tests one's speed.

The object is to hit the buzzer at the end of the course before the allotted time expires. If a competitor goes out of bounds or comes into contact with the water in any of the pits below the course, he or she is disqualified from the competition.

Typically, 85 to 90 of the original entrants are eliminated in this stage. However, in the 4th competition, a record 37 of the original competitors made it past the First Stage.

After the 4th, 17th, 24th, and 27th competition, the First Stage was thoroughly redesigned to be much more difficult and prevent large numbers of people from moving on.

In fact, a G4 special inside the making of the 18th Sasuke competition revealed that the redesign of the First Stage for the 18th competition was done with the intention of seeing all challengers fail it.

This did not happen, however, and that has only spurred the production team on to make this and all stages to follow even harder.

That goal was almost met in the 19th competition, where much to everyone's surprise, only two competitors cleared the First Stage neither of the two being Sasuke All-Stars , a record in Sasuke history.

The only time something similar has happened was in the first Kunoichi , where again, only two competitors cleared the First Stage.

Executive producer Ushio Higuchi said in interviews later that even he was surprised at the results, anticipating that around 10 to 12 people would survive in spite of the production team's attempts at making the First Stage unbeatable.

The Japanese announcer calls it the "Prism See-Saw. The Japanese announcer calls it the "Cross Bridge. Some call it the "Rope Hang," but that name is erroneous.

The Japanese announcer still calls the last two obstacles by their official names. Those with enough skill to complete Stage One then take on an even more grueling set of obstacles in Stage Two.

Like Stage One, the obstacles alter throughout the competitions, but all hold to the same principle: if the competitor makes a single mistake they fall into the water below.

The obstacles determine the time limit, and it is usually between 50 and seconds. Unlike the First Stage, which has always required the competitors to hit a buzzer at the end of the course to stop the clock and pass the course, the Second Stage did not have a buzzer at its end until the 8th competition.

Before then, the competitors simply walked through an open gate to stop the clock. From the 8th competition onward, the buzzer opens the gate.

If the competitor breaks the gate open without hitting the button, they are disqualified. In addition, the course judges can hold the gates closed if a competitor committed a foul earlier in the Second Stage that would result in their disqualification, such as using the Chain Reaction gloves on the Spider Walk as "Mr.

Sasuke " Katsumi Yamada had done in the 12th competition. On average, 10 to 15 competitors attempt the Second Stage on each competition.

A record 37 competitors attempted the Second Stage during the 4th competition. Also during the 4th competition, a record 11 competitors cleared the Second Stage.

During the 5th competition, however, only three men made it to the Second Stage due to new, tougher obstacles in the First Stage.

In the 19th competition, neither of the two qualified competitors cleared the circuit a fall and a timeout on the Salmon Ladder , marking the earliest end of a Sasuke competition.

Ninja Warrior just sees them as a single obstacle and calls it "Spider Walk". On Ninja Warrior , this obstacle is referred to as the Hammer Dodge.

The judges decided to start Stage 2 at the Salmon Ladder Ascent with a lowered time limit of seconds. The Third Stage has no time limit, allowing contestants to go at their own pace.

Contestants are allowed a few seconds of rest between obstacles during which they can apply "sticky spray" to improve their grip.

While the first two stages focus on speed and agility, this course almost exclusively tests one's upper body strength and stamina.

Out of 3, total competitors and Second Stage competitors, have attempted the Third Stage. The Third Stage is so grueling that, on average, someone passes it only every other competition.

Sending Climber [16]. But the English version and the Japanese announcer call them the "Pole Bridge. But the English version and the Japanese announcer call them the "Climbing Bars," one of the many gairaigo words borrowed from English used to describe Sasuke obstacles.

G4 calls it Ascending Climb. But the Japanese announcer calls it the "Lamp Grasper. G4 continues to call it the "Globe Grasp. To date, the Final Stage has known six forms.

Each of these share a single, common goal: to scale the tower and reach the button at the top before time expires. If the competitor does not reach the top platform in time, the rope is cut and the competitor falls they are caught by a safety line.

Starting from the 18th competition, the rope is no longer cut. The Final Stage's time limit is between 30 and 45 seconds.

Of all the competitors to attempt to claim victory, only 24 have been admitted to the Final Stage, and only six of them have gotten there more than once Akira Omori in the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd competitions, Shingo Yamamoto in the 3rd and 7th, Makoto Nagano in the 11th, 12th, 13th, his victory in the 17th competition and in the 23rd competition, Yuuji Urushihara in the 22nd and his victories in the 24th competition and 27th, Ryo Matachi in the 27th competition and 30th, Yusuke Morimoto's victory in the 31st competition and in the 35th competition.

Currently there are only four victors: Kazuhiko Akiyama defeated Sasuke in the 4th competition, Makoto Nagano in the 17th, Yuuji Urushihara in the 24th and in the 27th, and Yusuke Morimoto in the 31st.

The contestant must start climbing from a seated position. The second version of the Final Stage was unveiled in the 7th competition, when Shingo Yamamoto became the first to attempt it.

The height of the tower was increased to It consists of a After 15 seconds, the walls of the Spider Climb spread apart.

This ensnared Yordan Yovtchev during the 8th competition, when he failed to complete the Spider Climb before it began spreading, and fell off the tower.

The third version of the Final Stage was revealed in the 22nd competition, when Yuuji Urushihara was the first to try it.

Competitors are not dropped due to the Heavenly Ladder being in the way. The fourth version of the Final Stage was revealed in the 27th competition, when Ryo Matachi was the first to attempt it.

The time limit stayed at 40 seconds. Unlike the first version of the Final Stage, competitors started at a standing position instead of a seated position.

Its design was similar to that of the fourth version of the Final Stage consisting of a Rope Climb.

The time limit would have likely been 35 seconds, as Urushihara may have cleared this particular version with one second left. It was used for only one tournament.

For the sixth version, with the removal of the previous version of the Final Stage, it was not unusual to see a change similar to that of the 18—24 version from the Metal Ladder to the Heavenly Ladder.

The previous Final Stage consisting of a Rope Climb was thrown out all together and the return of the 7—17 Final Stage took its place. The Spider Walls seem to take up less space this time, and the Rope Climb appears to take up more.

The time limit is likely to stay the same at 30 seconds, though a second Final Stage is not out of the question.

In the 24th tournament a Nissan Fuga was also a prize if anyone could complete the Final Stage.

Typically, only one or two people make it to the Final Stage, if any make it at all. However, both the 3rd and 24th competitions saw a record five competitors attempt the Final Stage.

After the 4th competition, though, the Final Stage was only achieved on average every other tournament.

Ninja Warrior just calls them "Rope Climb", without the length of the ropes. These winners are not including the "kanzenseiha" Total Victory winners from the original Japanese version, or under any other varied rules including Team Ninja Warrior in Denmark and the United States.

Each episode now lasts thirty minutes and it also includes some minor changes in the on-screen graphics. Throughout the episode, there's the "Ninja Killer" for the obstacle that took out the most competitors and "Warrior Wipeout" honors the best wipeout segments.

The Japanese play-by-play commentary and interviews with the competitors have English subtitles , while the competitor profiles, replays , and introductions were dubbed by voice actor Dave Wittenberg.

The show became the highest rated program on the network since its debut. Aside from a few sporadic occurrences, reruns of Ninja Warrior stopped airing regularly sometime in December in wake of G4 slated to be rebranded as the Esquire Network on September 23, The last four episodes to air on G4 appeared as a two-hour block on April 10, It is unknown if Ninja Warrior would return to the network's schedule or if some other channel would acquire the series.

Commercials on G4 show American Ninja Warrior to air on G4 in July, marking it the last program being advertised on the network as a G4 program, and not an Esquire channel presentation.

They also stated that "Additional newer tournaments of the series, never seen in the U. Auditions on G4's website ended on August 18, Open tryouts were held in Los Angeles on August 29 and 30, , and were taped for the show, with ten finalists competing on the 23rd tournament of the original Ninja Warrior course in Japan in September The eight-episode series began airing on December 12, The qualifying round consists of over competitors, running an obstacle course strongly influenced by Sasuke 's First Stage.

The preliminaries used a leader board, and the 30 fastest times moved on to the semi-finals, which included the preliminary course plus three obstacles, the Tarzan Jump, the Jumping Bars, and a Net Climb.

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